Stand by your Board

STAND BY YOUR BOARD

 

Getting In The Mood

So the first stage is to dress for the part, get yourself mentally attuned as a diligent housewife.

Skirts must be worn at all times, preferably protected by a pretty apron or pinafore.


Setting The Temperature.

First look at the care label on the garment to see what fabric it is made from, and what setting the manu- facturers recommend.

Some irons actually have a fabric guide the majority do not. Most irons now have thermostatic settings symbolised by a series of dots You just set the iron to the setting marked on the care label.

The symbols most commonly used are these:


If you are in doubt, please do be cautious. Start with a cool iron and if this doesn’t seem to do the trick increase the temperature until the creases dissapear. How easily this happens will also depend on the moisture in the garment, so let’s look at judging the moisture.


Judging The Moisture.

Just like when you first learned to walk in high heels, judging whether your clothes are too damp or too dry to iron is all a matter of balance.


If the clothes are too wet when they are ironed you will get a poor finish and they will probably need ironing later.

But then again if the fabric has been allowed to get too dry it is often impossible to achieve a smooth, crisp finish. And we do want it crisp, don’t we?


For most common |fabrics you will need Ito iron them when they are just slightly damp to the touch. If they are already dry, either use the steam setting if your iron has one, or use a small spray such as you might buy for household plants.

Just be careful with silk and viscose as these fabrics will show water marks and so should not be sprayed. Chiffon, Practise your technique georgette, crepe and acrylic fibres should only be ironed when they are completely dry.


 

 

Practice Is Perfect

Now we have covered the basics of ironing it is time to pop on your pinnies, stand by your boards and practise your technique. Are we all ready? So let’s make a start.


1. Dampen the garment if necessary and set your iron to the required temperature for the garment to be ironed.


2. Iron the hems and the seams first, before moving on to the collars, then sleeves and pockets, and finally the main body of the
garment.


3. As a general rule always iron in the direction of the grain of the fabric using long, smooth strokes over as large an area as possible.


The exceptions to these are:

Iron fine wool with a light circular motion.

Iron knitted rayon diagonally.

Iron embroidery on the wrong side over a thick blanket or pad.

Iron tucks and gathers with the point of the iron.

Iron heavier materials by laying a damp, lint free cloth on top. This is the only way to get crisp pleats in skirts.


And remember girls, once you have taken all this trouble to get your clothes looking neat and smart, do be careful about how you then hang them up.


Try to ensure you have enough cupboard space to allow your blouses, dresses and skirts to hang freely.

If that means you have to be ruthless at times and actually pass on some of your little worn clothes to Oxfam, so be it.

If you are in doubt, please do be cautious. Start with a cool iron and if this doesn’t seem to do the trick increase the temperature until the creases dissapear. How easily this happens will also depend on the moisture in the garment, so let’s look at judging the moisture.

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